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CRA Creates New Offshore Compliance Advisory Committee

The CRA continues its efforts to strengthen tax compliance in Canada.

Following the CRA’s recent announcement of its efforts to crackdown on international tax evasion, the CRA announced the creation of a new Offshore Compliance Advisory Committee. From the CRA’s news release:

… The Offshore Compliance Advisory Committee (OCAC) will be composed of seven independent experts with significant legal, judicial and tax administration experience.

The members will provide input to the Minister and the CRA on additional administrative strategies for offshore compliance to build on the Budget 2016 investment.

The OCAC’s first meeting will be in spring, 2016, and its initial areas of focus will include:

  • Strategies to help alleviate and discourage offshore non-compliance;
  • Administrative policies being used by other tax administrations to address this global issue
  • Advice to the CRA in moving forward with its measurement of the tax gap;
  • Additional strategies and practices related to promoters of tax schemes; and
  • Potential ways to improve the CRA’s criminal investigation functions.

The OCAC will be chaired by Dr. Colin Campbell. Dr. Campbell is currently Associate Professor of Law at Western University and a published author on tax matters. The Committee’s Vice-Chair is Kimberley Brooks, Associate Professor of the Schulich school of Law at Dalhousie University. Ms. Brooks, a member of the Canadian Tax Foundation Board of Governors and a member of the International Fiscal Association, practiced law in Toronto and the United Kingdom.

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CRA Creates New Offshore Compliance Advisory Committee

CRA Provides Update on Efforts to Combat Tax Evasion

Following the release of the “Panama Papers” and the Canadian federal government’s budget announcement that additional resources will be directed to the CRA to collect existing tax debts and combat tax evasion, the CRA has provided an update on its “crack down on tax evasion and tax avoidance”.

The CRA stated that the first jurisdiction that will be investigated is the Isle of Man, which the CRA had identified as the recipient of CDN$860 million of electronic funds transfers by approximately 800 taxpayers. Additional jurisdictions and financial institutions will be included in a second investigative project starting in May 2016.

The CRA also announced several other aspects of its program including the hiring of new auditors/specialists, a focus on tax schemes targeted to wealthy taxpayers, investigations of high-risk multinational corporations, use of investigative tools and technology, larger investigation teams, international collaboration, and the formation of an independent advisory committee on tax evasion and aggressive tax planning.

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CRA Provides Update on Efforts to Combat Tax Evasion

The Canada Revenue Agency’s Voluntary Disclosure Program: Current Processing Issues

The Canada Revenue Agency’s Voluntary Disclosure Program (VDP) has gone through a number of organizational changes over the past few years. For many years, disclosures were made to the local Tax Services Office. More recently, the CRA has moved the handling of disclosures to Regional Centres; Shawinigan – Sud Tax Centre for the Atlantic, Quebec, and Ontario Regions, Winnipeg Tax Centre for the Prairie Region and Surrey Tax Centre for the Pacific Region.

With the move of the VDP to Regional Centres, the CRA has implemented a new screening process. Screeners are now reviewing disclosure packages soon after receipt and are comparing the package to a CRA developed checklist. If any item on the checklist is missing or incomplete, then the CRA returns the package to the sender, along with a covering letter and a checklist that identifies the missing or incomplete information. There are, however, certain issues that have arisen with respect to the CRA’s screening process and use of the checklist.

First, it prevents a disclosure from being made by a taxpayer who does not have a social insurance number, business number, etc. If an identification number is not available, the disclosure may need to be made on a no-names basis while the taxpayer applies for an identification number.

Second, the CRA will not accept a disclosure if the amount in issue is not identified. This is problematic as, often, disclosures are made before the work needed to calculate the omitted or under-reported amount has been completed. In the past, this information was forwarded within 90 days of filing the disclosure and was an approach acceptable to the CRA.

Third, where the disclosure package is large, screeners do not appear to be reviewing all of the documents before issuing the letter and checklist. Therefore, it is advisable to use a covering letter for each disclosure package which identifies compliance with each item on the CRA’s checklist and a detailed explanation as to why any checklist item is outstanding. It is not yet clear whether, even upon explanation, the CRA will accept a disclosure if a checklist item is outstanding.

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The Canada Revenue Agency’s Voluntary Disclosure Program: Current Processing Issues

When is Voluntary Disclosure Voluntary?

In Worsfold v. The Queen (2012 FC 644), the Federal Court held that a taxpayer’s disclosure under the Voluntary Disclosures Program (the “VDP”) was “voluntary”, even though the Canada Revenue Agency (the “CRA”) had commenced enforcement action against a related party. Worsfold confirms that a link between the enforcement action and the disclosed information is what is important — not a link between the parties — when considering whether a disclosure made alongside an existing enforcement action is voluntary. Also, given that the sequence of events was integral to the findings in this case, this decision underscores the importance of keeping detailed records at every stage of a voluntary disclosure.

To read the full article, please click here.

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When is Voluntary Disclosure Voluntary?