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Taxpayers’ Ombudsman Addresses CBA Meeting

On January 27, 2016, Sherra Profit, the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman, addressed a meeting of the Canadian Bar Association Tax Section on the subject of assisting taxpayers in resolving their service complaints.

The Office of the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman handles individual complaints from taxpayers where he/she was not able to resolve a service complaint through the CRA’s internal process or if the complaint process hasn’t been tried and there are compelling circumstances for the Ombudsman to review it. Such compelling circumstances could include, for example, situations in which an auditor repeatedly contacts a taxpayer when the taxpayer has asked them to deal with their authorized representative, or unexplained delays by the CRA in processing a refund.

The Ombudsman’s mandate with respect to individual complaints is strictly on the service side, and no technical tax issues will be considered in the investigation.

The Ombudsman also handles systemic investigations in respect of which she reports directly to the Minister of National Revenue. Such investigations have addressed processing delays, or system-wide mistakes (i.e., a large number of individual taxpayers being erroneously classified as deceased in the CRA’s database). These systemic investigations could arise out of recurring complaints, requests from tax professionals, or otherwise.

The Office of the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman operates independent of the CRA and attempts to be impartial and fair in the review of service-related complaints. The Ombudsman is ultimately accountable to the Minister, not the CRA.  All information communicated to the Ombudsman through the complaint process is kept confidential, except to the extent a taxpayer gives consent to its release to assist the investigatory process.

Ms. Sherra also provided a list of tips for tax professionals for assisting their clients with service-related complaints:

  1. Manage the taxpayer’s expectations
  2. Use the CRA Service Complaints Program first, unless compelling circumstances exist
  3. Provide a signed consent to authorize a representative
  4. Submit detailed information

Contact information, if a complaint is contemplated, can be found on the Ombudsman’s website.

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Taxpayers’ Ombudsman Addresses CBA Meeting

Yes, Those Emails are Tax Phishing Scams

We were alerted today that some individuals had received fake emails informing the recipient that he/she had received an Interac email money transfer (i.e., a surprise refund).

The emails arrive with the subject line “INTERAC e-Transfer from Canada Revenue Agency System” and appear to emanate from Interac, Dentons, or canadiantaxlitigation.com.

Those emails are a scam. If you receive one of these emails do not click any links in such emails, and do not confirm or provide any personal data. 

Several concerned individuals forwarded sample emails to us:

From: “notify@payments.interac.ca” <admin@canadiantaxlitigation.com>

Date: October 29, 2015 at 2:56:31 PM EDT

To: name@email.com

Subject: INTERAC e-Transfer from Canada Revenue Agency System

<>Dear Tax Payer,

<>Canada Revenue Agency has sent you an INTERAC e-Transfer (previously INTERAC Email Money Transfer).

<>Amount: $741.28
<>Sender’s Message: A message was not provided
<>Expiry Date: 30 October 2015

<>Action Required:
<>To deposit your money, click here: http:/www.cra-arc.gc.ca/confirm/interac/services/REF=IDREFCASE741.28

<>2015 Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Support

Please see our previous post on fraudulent tax scams here and here.

The CRA’s Security page is available here.

These email tax scams should be reported to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

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Yes, Those Emails are Tax Phishing Scams

Beware of Tax Phishing Scams

We have recently become aware (again) of fake emails purporting to emanate from the CRA and informing the recipient that he/she has received an Interac email money transfer (i.e., a surprise refund).

Generally, the text of these emails is as follows:

Dear TaxPayer,

Canada Revenue Agency has sent you an INTERAC e-Transfer
 (previously INTERAC Email Money Transfer).

Amount: $827.71 (CAD)
Sender’s Message: A message was not provided
Expiry Date: 10 October 2014

Action Required:
To deposit your money, click here: [fake URL here]

2014 Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Online Support

These are scam emails and the recipients should never open any attachments or links that may accompany or be embedded in the emails.

The CRA has previously warned about these types of phishing scams:

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) warns all taxpayers to beware of telephone calls or emails that claim to be from the CRA but are not. These are phishing and other fraudulent scams that could result in identity and financial theft.

People should be especially aware of phishing scams asking for information such as credit card, bank account, and passport numbers. The CRA would never ask for this type information. Some of these scams ask for this personal information directly, and others refer the taxpayer to a Web site resembling the CRA’s, where the person is asked to verify their identity by entering personal information. Taxpayers should not click on links included in these emails. Email scams may also contain embedded malicious software that can harm your computer and put your personal information at risk.

Examples of recent telephone scams involve threatening or coercive language to scare individuals into pre-paying fictitious debt to the CRA. These calls should be ignored and reported to the RCMP (see contact information below).

Examples of recent email scams include notifications to taxpayers that they are entitled to a refund of a specific amount, or informing taxpayers that their tax assessment has been verified and they are eligible to receive a tax refund. These emails often have CRA logos or internet links that appear official. Some contain obvious grammar or spelling mistakes.

These types of communication are not from the CRA.

More information is available the CRA’s Security webpage.

Recipients of these scam emails should report the email to info@antifraudcentre.ca or contact the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

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Beware of Tax Phishing Scams