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Ironside: TCC Orders Hearing of Question on Rule 58 Motion

In Ironside v. The Queen (2015 TCC 116), the Tax Court allowed the Crown’s Rule 58 motion for a determination of a question of law before the hearing, namely whether the taxpayer was estopped from litigating an issue that had been adjudicated in an earlier Tax Court decision.

In the prior case (Ironside v. The Queen (2013 TCC 339)), the taxpayer had incurred legal and professional fees to defend himself against allegations of committing improper disclosures after being charged in June 2001 by the Alberta Securities Commission. The taxpayer sought to deduct such fees in the 2003 and 2004 tax years.

The Tax Court concluded that the taxpayer’s legal and professional fees had not been incurred to gain or produce income from his chartered accounting business, rather such expenses were personal in nature and were incurred to protect his reputation in the oil and gas industry. The Tax Court dismissed the taxpayer’s appeal.

Subsequently, the taxpayer sought to make the same deductions in the 2007, 2008 and 2009 tax years. The CRA reassessed to deny the deductions, and the taxpayer again appealed to the Tax Court.

In its Reply, the Crown raised the issue of whether “the appeal or a portion of it is barred by application of the doctrine of issue estoppel or is otherwise an abuse of the process of the Court”. The Crown then brought a motion for an order pursuant to Rule 58 of the Tax Court of Canada Rules (General Procedure) for a determination of a question prior to the appeal:

Whether the Appellant is barred from litigating within proceeding 2014-1619(IT)G whether the legal and professional fees paid to defend himself in Alberta Securities Commission proceedings and the subsequent appeal are deductible as amounts incurred to gain or produce income from a business or property, on the basis that the characterization of such fees has been previously adjudicated upon and therefore the doctrines of issue estoppel and or abuse of process operate to bar re-litigation of the issue.

The Tax Court noted that Rule 58 contains a two-step process. At the first stage, the Tax Court must determine whether the question posed by the moving party is an appropriate one that should be heard in a subsequent hearing (the second stage).

At the first stage, three elements must exist:

  1. The question proposed must be a question of law, fact, or mixed fact and law;
  2. The question must be raised in the pleadings; and
  3. The determination of the question may dispose of all or part of the appeal, may substantially shorten the hearing, or may result in substantial cost saving.

If all of these elements are present, the Court may set a hearing of the proposed question before a motions judge prior to the hearing of the appeal.

In the present case, the Tax Court held that all three requirements were satisfied. The Court stated,

[12] Clearly, there is the potential that a determination of this question may, according to the materials I have before me and the submissions I heard, dispose of part of the appeal and I need only be satisfied that it “may” so dispose of some of the appeal. I do not have to be absolutely convinced that it will do so in order to refer the question to a Stage Two determination prior to the hearing. If part of the appeal is disposed of, it follows that the proceeding will be substantially shortened. This is precisely the type of question that Rule 58 is meant to target.

The Tax Court ordered that the Crown’s question be set down for a hearing for determination by a motions judge and that certain evidence be presented at the determination (i.e., the pleadings from both appeals, and the Tax Court’s decision in Ironside v. The Queen (2013 TCC 339)).

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Ironside: TCC Orders Hearing of Question on Rule 58 Motion

FCA: TCC Erred in Awarding Costs on Basis of Pre-Appeal Conduct

The Tax Court has in recent years demonstrated a willingness to use cost awards to control the parties’ conduct. This includes awarding lump-sum amounts, which may depart markedly from the “tariff” amounts described in Tariff B of Schedule II of the Tax Court’s General Procedure Rules. Further, the Court has wrestled with the weight – if any – that the parties’ conduct prior to an appeal should carry in respect of a cost award.

In Martin v. The Queen (2013 TCC 38), the taxpayer successfully challenged a section 160 assessment in respect of certain amounts paid to her by her spouse. There was evidence the auditor had deliberately misled the taxpayer during an audit, and the taxpayer had spent considerable time and money enduring the audit and objection process before her ultimate success in the Tax Court.

On the issue of costs, the taxpayer asked for (i) solicitor-client costs, or (ii) a fixed amount under Rule 147, or (iii) the tariff costs. The Crown argued that only tariff costs should be awarded. Describing the case as “very unusual, difficult, and hopefully exceptional, case”, the Tax Court considered the pre-appeal conduct of the CRA (among other factors) and awarded the taxpayer a lump sum amount of $10,635 (2014 TCC 50).

The Tax Court repeated its view that costs may be awarded against the Crown where it pursues a meritless case in the Tax Court:

[21] … There are perhaps some arguments and some cases that the Canada Revenue Agency just should not pursue. The Crown is not a private party. By reassessing a taxpayer and failing to resolve its objection, the Crown is forcing its citizen/taxpayers to take it to Court. If the Crown’s position does not have a reasonable degree of sustainability, and is in fact entirely rejected, it is entirely appropriate that the Crown should be aware it is proceeding subject to the risk of a possibly increased award of costs against it if it is unsuccessful.

The Crown appealed and the taxpayer cross-appealed.

The Federal Court of Appeal noted that a discretionary cost award should only be set aside if the judge made an error in principle or if the award is plainly wrong (see Hamilton v. Open Window Bakery (2004 SCC 9) and Sun Indalex Finance LLC v. United Steelworkers (2013 SCC 6)).

In the Court of Appeal, the Crown alleged that the Tax Court judge had made an error of fact  (i.e., the finding that the CRA auditor had been deceitful in providing incorrect information), and an error of law (i.e., relying on the auditor’s deceitful conduct as a basis for awarding increased costs).

On the first issue, the Court held there was no error of law because the Crown admitted the auditor had engaged in deceitful behavior. On the second issue, the Court noted that conduct that occurs prior to a proceeding may be taken into account if such conduct unduly and unnecessarily prolongs the proceeding (see Merchant v. Canada (2001 FCA 19) and Canada v. Landry (2010 FCA 135)). However, the Court stated that the audit and objection stages are not a “proceeding”, which is defined in section 2 of the Rules as an appeal or reference. Accordingly, the Court stated, “the Judge erred in principle in allowing an amount incurred in respect of costs unrelated to the appeal which were incurred at the objection stage. Those expenses, by definition, were not incurred as part of the appeal ‘proceeding’”.

In respect of the cross-appeal, the Court of Appeal considered whether the lower court had erred in declining to award solicitor-client costs. The Court held there was no error because such costs could not include pre-appeal costs, and even if such costs could be awarded, solicitor-client costs are awarded only where there has been reprehensible, scandalous or outrageous misconduct connected with the litigation (see also Scavuzzo v. The Queen (2006 TCC 90)).

The Court allowed the appeal, dismissed the cross-appeal, set aside the lower court’s cost award and substituted a cost award of $4,800 plus disbursements and taxes (2015 FCA 95).

The Court of Appeal decision in Martin may have failed to address all relevant provisions of Rule 147, which arguably provide for very broad discretion for awarding costs. For example, paragraph 147(3)(j) of the Tax Court Rules states the Court may consider “any other matter relevant to the question of costs”.

The Court of Appeal’s decision also raises an issue regarding the circumstances in which deceitful pre-appeal conduct may unduly or unnecessarily prolong a proceeding – wouldn’t such a hindrance follow in every case of deceitful conduct by a party?

Further, the Court of Appeal appeared particularly concerned that the taxpayer’s pre-appeal expenses could not be addressed in the cost award, but it seems clear that the Tax Court had exercised its discretion to award a lump sum based not only on the quantum of the pre-appeal costs but on the existence of the auditor’s deceitful behavior and the Crown’s obstinate approach and refusal to resolve – at any stage – an uncomplicated tax dispute.

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FCA: TCC Erred in Awarding Costs on Basis of Pre-Appeal Conduct

Two New Judges Appointed to Tax Court of Canada

Two new judges have been appointed to the Tax Court of Canada.

From the news release published by the Department of Justice:

OTTAWA, February 6, 2015 – The Honourable Peter MacKay, P.C., Q.C., M.P. for Central Nova, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, today announced the following appointments:

The Honourable Dominique Lafleur, a lawyer with KPMG in Montreal is appointed a judge of the Tax Court of Canada to replace Madam Justice L. Lamarre, who has been appointed Associate Chief Justice of the Tax Court of Canada.

Madam Justice Lafleur received a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Montréal in 1989 and a Master’s degree in Taxation from the University of Sherbrooke in 1993. She was admitted to the Bar of Quebec in 1990.

Madam Justice Lafleur had been a lawyer with KPMG in Montreal since 2014. Prior to that, she had been counsel with Heenan Blaikie LLP, LLC in Montréal (1996-2014) and with Mendelson Rosentzveig Schacter (1991-96) working in the area of taxation. She had been a member of the consultative committee and Chair of Taxation and Public Finance at the University of Sherbrooke since 2006 and had been a speaker at study sessions and conferences on taxation for the Canadian Tax Foundation.

The Honourable Sylvain Ouimet, a lawyer with the Department of Justice Canada in Ottawa and Montreal is appointed a judge of the Tax Court of Canada to replace Mr. Justice P. Bédard, who resigned effective August 31, 2014.

Mr. Justice Ouimet received a Bachelor in Business Administration (Finance) from l’Université du Québec à Montréal in 1993 and a Bachelor of Laws from l’Université de Montréal in 1997. He also earned a “Certificat en initiation au droit français” from l’Université de Poitiers in France in 1996. He was admitted to the Bar of Quebec in 1999.

Mr. Justice Ouimet had been a lawyer with the Department of Justice’s Ottawa and Montreal offices working in the area of taxation since 2002. Previously, he had been a competition law officer for Industry Canada in Gatineau (2001-02) and an analyst for Laboratoires Abbott Limitée in Montreal (2000).

These appointments are effective immediately.

Two New Judges Appointed to Tax Court of Canada

ConocoPhillips: FCA Confirms Tax Court’s Jurisdiction to Determine Questions of Timing and the Validity of a Notice of Objection

In ConocoPhillips Canada Resources Corp. v. The Queen (2014 FCA 297), the Federal Court of Appeal overturned a Federal Court decision (2013 FC 1192) and dismissed an application for judicial review by the taxpayer finding that the Federal Court lacked jurisdiction in this case.

ConocoPhillips had commenced an application for judicial review as a result of a dispute between the CRA about whether a Notice of Reassessment had been validly sent to the taxpayer.  The CRA alleged that it mailed a Notice of Reassessment on November 7, 2008. ConocoPhillips alleged that it never received the Notice of Reassessment and that it first learned of the reassessment on April 14, 2010.

Accordingly, when ConocoPhillips filed a Notice of Objection on June 7, 2010, the CRA advised that it would not consider the objection on the grounds that it was not filed within 90 days of the alleged mailing date (i.e., November 7, 2008) and that no request for an extension of time was made within the year following the alleged mailing date of the reassessment.

The Federal Court considered the question of jurisdiction and found that it had jurisdiction because the Court was not being asked to consider the validity of the reassessment (which can only be determined by the Tax Court of Canada) but rather, was only being asked to review the CRA’s decision not to consider the objection.

Based on the standard of reasonableness, the Federal Court found in favour of ConocoPhillips on the basis that the CRA had not sufficiently engaged the evidence to appropriately render an opinion whether or not the reassessment was mailed on the alleged date. The Court set aside that decision.

The Crown appealed to the Federal Court of Appeal on the basis that the Federal Court lacked jurisdiction on this issue.  The Federal Court of Appeal allowed the appeal.

Section 18.5 of the Federal Courts Act provides that judicial review in the Federal Court is not available where, inter alia, an appeal is permitted on the issue before the Tax Court of Canada.  In the present case, the Federal Court of Appeal stated that, pursuant to subsection 169(1)(b) of the Income Tax Act (Canada), ConocoPhillips could have appealed to the Tax Court after 90 days had elapsed following the date its objection was initially filed and the Tax Court would have been the correct forum to determine if, or when, the Notice of Reassessment was mailed and when the time for filing a Notice of Objection expired.

The Federal Court of Appeal clarified that the Minister’s obligation to consider a Notice of Objection is triggered regardless of whether a Notice of Objection may have been filed within the required time-frame. Further, the Minister’s decision on this issue is not an impediment to filing an appeal to the Tax Court pursuant to paragraph 169(1)(b) of the Income Tax Act (Canada). Accordingly, judicial review of this issue was not available in the Federal Court.

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ConocoPhillips: FCA Confirms Tax Court’s Jurisdiction to Determine Questions of Timing and the Validity of a Notice of Objection

Update: TCC and FCA Appointments

Tax Court of Canada

Associate Chief Justice Eugene Rossiter has been appointed as the next Chief Justice of the Tax Court of Canada. Justice Rossiter replaces current Chief Justice Gerald Rip, who has elected to become a Supernumerary Judge of the Tax Court.

Federal Court of Appeal

C. Michael Ryer has been appointed as a Judge of the Federal Court of Appeal. Justice Ryer served as Judge of the Court of Appeal from 2006 to 2009, after which he became counsel to Deloitte Tax Law LLP in Calgary. Justice Ryer replaces Justice Karen Sharlow, who retired from the Court in September 2014.

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Update: TCC and FCA Appointments

Legge: Improper Pleading Fatal to Crown’s Case

What must the Crown plead and how must she plead it?

This question became an issue in the Tax Court’s recent decision in Legge v. The Queen (2014 TCC 360), in which the Tax Court allowed a taxpayer’s appeal due to the Crown’s failure to properly plead its case in the Reply.

In Legge, the taxpayer received pension and business income in 2006 and 2007. On November 27, 2008, the taxpayer filed income tax returns for 2006 and 2007. In these returns, the taxpayer reported business losses from self-employment, and thus pensionable earnings was reported as nil.

Subsequently, on November 12, 2012, the taxpayer filed T1 adjustment requests for 2006 and 2007 and changed the business losses to business income. The taxpayer reported self-employed pensionable earnings of $5,524 and $5,116 in 2006 and 2007, respectively.

Under the Canada Pension Plan, a person must make CPP contributions on the amount of his/her self-employed earnings (which include income from a business and certain other amounts). Under section 30 of the Canada Pension Plan, a taxpayer who must make a contribution in respect of self-employed earnings must file a return with certain information. Importantly, subsection 30(5) states as follows:

(5) The amount of any contribution required by this Act to be made by a person for a year in respect of their self-employed earnings for the year is deemed to be zero where

(a) the return of those earnings required by this section to be filed with the Minister is not filed with the Minister before the day that is four years after the day on or before which the return is required by subsection (1) to be filed; and

(b) the Minister does not assess the contribution before the end of those four years.

 In Legge, the Crown argued that subsection 30(5) applied in this case because the taxpayer had failed to file a return of self-employed earnings within four years of the filing due date. Rather, the taxpayer reported losses rather than earnings.

The Tax Court rejected this argument on the basis that subsection 30(5) applies only if there is a failure to file and the CRA had not assessed contributions within the four-year period. The Tax Court noted that, in the present case, the assessment requirement was not mentioned in the Reply and was not mentioned by Crown counsel at the hearing. Since there was no assumption as to what assessments (if any) were made, the Crown had the burden to adduce evidence that the requirement in paragraph 30(5)(b) had been satisfied. The Crown had not adduced evidence on this point.

The Tax Court noted that this result was “in a sense a windfall” to the taxpayer, but “the Crown is well aware of the requirement to properly plead its case and to establish the facts supporting its position, either by evidence or by assumptions.”

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Legge: Improper Pleading Fatal to Crown’s Case

McKesson: Additional Submissions on Motion

“The Order and Reasons for Recusal do not and should not form part of the record before this Court. Their existence in the public domain does not compromise the ability of this Court to adjudicate the appeal or the appearance and reality of a fair process.”
-Crown’s Written Representations

In the most recent developments in the McKesson transfer pricing case, the Respondent has filed its Written Representations in response to the Appellant’s motion to raise new issues on appeal, and the Appellant has filed a Reply submission.

In the Written Representations, the Respondent has argued that the trial judge’s Order and Reasons for Recusal are irrelevant to the issues to be decided on appeal and do not properly form part of the record before the Federal Court of Appeal. The Respondent has also argued that the Order and Reasons for Recusal do not compromise the appearance and reality of a fair process in the appeal.

In its Reply, the Appellant has argued that the Respondent’s “remarkable position” that the Reasons for Recusal are not part of the record on appeal cannot be right. Rather, the Appellant argues, the Court of Appeal should perform a “meaningful review” of the Reasons for Recusal, as such reasons should not be “immune from review” or “shielded from appellate scrutiny”. The Appellant states, “The panel of this Court hearing the Appellant’s appeal must be given the opportunity to adjudicate [the Recusal Reasons'] legal effect.”

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McKesson: Additional Submissions on Motion

McKesson: Taxpayer Seeks to Raise Additional Issue on Appeal

“Judges are expected to decide cases as framed by the parties, then step back and allow the appellate process to unfold. In this case, the trial judge did neither.”
- Taxpayer’s Supplemental Memorandum of Fact and Law

The transfer pricing case of McKesson v. The Queen has raised procedural issues that are without precedent in Canadian tax cases. This week, those procedural issues became a central part of the matters that will be considered by the Federal Court of Appeal.

In a Notice of Motion (and other materials) filed this week, the taxpayer has asked for a new trial before the Tax Court.

Background

McKesson is a case involving transfer pricing adjustments under section 247 of the Income Tax Act (Canada) in respect of the factoring of accounts receivable as well as the limitation period in Article 9(3) of the Canada-Luxembourg Tax Convention. The Tax Court dismissed the taxpayer’s appeal.

After the taxpayer had commenced an appeal in the Federal Court of Appeal, Tax Court Justice Patrick Boyle recused himself (2014 TCC 266) from the two remaining issues before the lower court (i.e., costs and the content of the Tax Court’s public file) on the basis that the taxpayer had, in its materials filed in the Court of Appeal, accused of him of bias (see our previous post here).

Notice of Motion

On November 3, the taxpayer filed a Notice of Motion in the Federal Court of Appeal for leave to file (i) an Amended Notice of Appeal, and (ii) a Supplementary Memorandum of Fact and Law. In its Motion, the taxpayer states that Justice Boyle’s reasons for recusal raise a further ground of appeal in addition to those already set out in the original Notice of Appeal. The proposed Amended Notice of Appeal and Supplementary Memorandum of Fact and Law address the following additional ground of appeal:

Do the trial judge’s Recusal Reasons compromise the appearance and reality of a fair process in this case such that a new trial is necessary?

Specifically, the proposed Amended Notice of Appeal states,

8. The Trial Judge’s Reasons for Recusal dated September 4, 2014 interfere with the fairness of the appellate process and compromise the appearance and reality fairness of both the trial and appeal.

The taxpayer has also hired additional counsel in respect of the motion, namely Henein Hutchison LLP, a Toronto-based litigation law firm.

Taxpayer’s Arguments

The taxpayer’s Written Representations in support of its Motion argue that the recusal reasons were directed at the Court of Appeal and have compromised the fairness of the case. The taxpayer argues that this “improper intervention” has compromised the integrity of the appeal process.

The taxpayer’s Supplementary Memorandum of Fact and Law states that the trial judge’s “intervention in this appeal was ill-advised and improper”. The taxpayer argues that the trial judge should have remained “above the fray” and should not have “put himself into the appellate arena”.

The taxpayer characterizes the recusal reasons as a “post-hoc attempt to justify to an appellate court a decision given many months earlier” [emphasis in original]. The taxpayer states that the “Recusal Reasons are nothing less than an explicit attempt by the trial judge to insert himself into the appellate process as an advocate against the Appellant and its lawyers.”

The taxpayer argues that the recusal reasons must be considered part of the record in the case before the Federal Court of Appeal. A new trial would, in the taxpayer’s view, give it “an opportunity to make its case at trial, free of the unfairness that has now tainted this proceeding.”

The taxpayer also argued that the recusal reasons have undermined the solicitor-client relationship, and retrospectively reveal the trial judge’s disposition against the taxpayer.

The taxpayer has requested that the appeal be allowed and the matter remitted to the Tax Court for a new trial before a different judge.

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The Crown has not yet filed its response to the taxpayer’s Notice of Motion.

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McKesson: Taxpayer Seeks to Raise Additional Issue on Appeal

1057513 Ontario Inc.: The Clear Meaning of Subsection 129(1)

At the heart of tax integration in Canada is the refundable tax and dividend refund mechanism in subsection 129(1) of the Income Tax Act (the “Act”).

Generally, to avoid undue deferral of tax on investment income earned through a “Canadian-controlled private corporation”, such corporations must pay refundable tax on investment income (either under Part I or Part IV of the Act), which effectively brings the corporate tax rate on such income to the same rate had the income been earned directly by the Canadian shareholder.

In order to ensure that such income once distributed to an individual shareholder is not subject to double taxation, the Act provides that taxable dividends paid by a private corporation entitle the corporation to a refund of the lesser of 1/3rd of the taxable dividends paid and the balance of the corporation’s “refundable dividend tax on hand” (“RDTOH”) account. Importantly, the Act imposes a strict deadline for obtaining the refund: the return for the year in which the refund is claimed must be filed within three years of the end of the year in which the dividend is paid.

Despite this seemingly clear-cut limitation period, a number of taxpayers over the years have turned to the courts to seek what amounts to a judicial extension of the filing deadline. 1057513 Ontario Inc. v. The Queen (2014 TCC 272) is the latest in a line of recent decisions considering whether the three-year refund limitation period is absolute.

In 1057513, the taxpayer declared and paid dividends to its shareholder in the 1997-2004 tax years. The taxpayer’s director and officer was unaware that a personal holding corporation had an obligation to file a tax return in the years in question. Upon the filing of the tax returns in 2008, the CRA assessed Part IV dividend tax (and interest and penalties) and denied the dividend refund claim.

On appeal, the taxpayer made three arguments: (i) the language in subsection 129(1) was ambiguous (or “at least not unambiguous”), (ii) a textual, contextual and purposive (“TCP”) analysis of the provision reveals latent ambiguities which should allow for a late refund, and (iii) the filing deadline is directory, not mandatory, meaning that not filing the return on time is not fatal to the refund claim.

Not surprisingly, the Tax Court dismissed the appeal. Relying on Tawa Developments Inc. v. The Queen (2011 TCC 440) and other relevant decisions, the Tax Court determined that there was nothing textually unambiguous about the requirement to file a return within three years, finding the statutory language to be “strikingly lucid and abundantly clear”.

Under the TCP argument, the taxpayer argued that the Court should read out the deadline because it was “antipodal” to the integration principal. The Court disagreed, and concluded that the rule was necessary in the context and for the purpose of achieving an effective self-assessing system. Finally, the Court was not swayed by the taxpayer’s argument that a filing deadline without a penalty is directory and not mandatory. The Court noted that while there may be no penalty per se, there was certainly a consequence of the failure to file – that being the inability to access the dividend refund.

It seems clear from the jurisprudence to date that the three-year filing deadline for obtaining a dividend refund under subsection 129(1) is absolute. Taxpayers and their advisors are encouraged to file returns as soon as possible to avoid the potential punitive double-taxation.

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1057513 Ontario Inc.: The Clear Meaning of Subsection 129(1)

McKesson: Trial Judge Recuses Self From Two Remaining Issues in Transfer Pricing Case

In McKesson v. The Queen (2014 TCC 266), Justice Patrick Boyle recused himself from the two remaining issues with which he was seized in the transfer pricing case – costs and the content of the court’s public file (i.e., the determination of whether certain information may be confidential).

This unusual decision arises as a result of the content of the Appellant’s factum filed in the Federal Court of Appeal in the appeal of Justice Boyle’s trial decision in McKesson (see our posts on the Tax Court case here and the Federal Court of Appeal proceeding here and here).

In his recusal reasons, Justice Boyle wrote:

[4]        As detailed below, I have, of my own motion, decided that I am compelled to consider whether I need to recuse myself from the two remaining issues before this Court. A consideration of this issue is required because I became aware that the Appellant and Appellant’s counsel, together with its co-counsel in the Federal Court of Appeal in respect of the appeal of the trial decision, had made certain public written statements about me in its factum in the Federal Court of Appeal (the “Factum”) which, upon reflection, appear to me to clearly include:

(i)         allegations that I was untruthful and deceitful in my Reasons;

(ii)         clear untruths about me, what I said and heard in the course of the trial, as well as the existence of evidentiary foundations supporting what I wrote in my Reasons; and

(iii)        allegations of impartiality on my part.

[5]        This requires me to consider whether:

(i)         I believe that a reasonable person reading the Factum, my Reasons, and the relevant portions of the transcript would believe that the trial judge so strongly complained of by McKesson Canada might not be able to remain impartial in his consideration of costs and confidential information;

(ii)         I believe I can impartially consider, weigh and decide the costs and confidential information issues before me; and

(iii)        whether the public challenge of my impartiality expressed by McKesson Canada and its co-counsel in the Factum is itself sufficient to warrant recusing myself at this stage.

 …

[133]     I view these as public allegations by a party to the costs and confidential information matters remaining before this Court that, regardless of the merits of their reasoning or their thoughts, I am unable to decide the remaining matters impartially. I believe that a reasonable person reading only these phrases from the Factum, without reviewing my Reasons or the trial Transcript, would believe that such strong complaints by McKesson Canada and its counsel may give rise to a serious doubt that I will be seen to be able to dispose of the two remaining issues and discharge my duties on an impartial basis.

[136]     For the Reasons identified above, I have decided I have to recuse myself from the remaining costs and confidential information issues in McKesson Canada’s proceeding in this Court.

[137]     It may be that some of the perceived untruths about the trial judge described above under heading II might individually not warrant recusal, and may be within an appellate advocate’s licence to overstate through the use of absolutes like ‘never’, ‘only’ and ‘any’.

[138]     However, I am satisfied that a reasonable fair-minded Canadian, informed and aware of all the issues addressed above, would entertain doubt that I could remain able to reach impartial decisions. I believe that such a reasonable fair-minded and informed person, viewing this realistically and practically would, after appropriate reflection, be left with a reasoned suspicion or apprehension of bias, actual or perceived. Canadians should rightly expect their trial judges to have broad shoulders and thick skins when a losing party appeals their decision, but I do not believe Canadians think that should extend to accusations of dishonesty by the judge, nor to untruths about the judge. Trial judges should not have to defend their honour and integrity from such inappropriate attacks. English is a very rich language; the Appellant and its counsel could have forcefully advanced their chosen grounds for appeal without the use of unqualified extreme statements which attack the personal or professional integrity of the trial judge.

[139]     For these reasons, I will be advising my Chief Justice that I am recusing myself from completing the McKesson Canada proceeding in the Tax Court. This extends to the consideration and disposition of the costs submissions of the parties in this case, as well as to the 2010 confidential information order of Justice Hogan in this case and its proper final implementation by the Tax Court and its Registry.

No date has been set for the hearing of the main matter by the Federal Court of Appeal.

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McKesson: Trial Judge Recuses Self From Two Remaining Issues in Transfer Pricing Case