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Highlights from the Toronto Centre CRA & Professionals Group Breakfast Seminar – February 19, 2015

On February 19, 2015, at the Toronto Centre CRA & Professionals Group Breakfast Seminar CRA representatives provided an update on two topics: 1) online CRA e-services, and 2) Regulation 102 and Regulation 105 waivers for non-residents.

An Overview of E-Services for Tax Professionals and Businesses

Maxime Leger and Marc Boisseau, Senior Programs Officers at the Assessment and Benefit Services Branch, provided updates regarding CRA e-services under the My Account, My Business Account and Represent a Client portals. In general, these online portals allow taxpayers, or designated representatives, to submit documents, view and manage various tax accounts online.

My Account

  • Two levels are now required to login and access My Account. In level 1, the taxpayer is required provide personal information (social insurance number, date of birth, postal code, amounts entered on income tax and benefit return) to create a user ID and password. In level 2, the taxpayer receives the CRA security code.
  • After obtaining online access to My Account, Taxpayers can view Notice of Assessment and the status of tax returns. If the taxpayer registers to manage online mail, the CRA will no longer send paper copies. The taxpayer will receive email notifications to check My Account.
  • Taxpayers can register for online mail through NETFILE or EFILE software, by filing a T1 return, online using My Account service or by speaking with an agent.
  • Canadian resident individuals, corporations, and certain partnerships and trusts that, at any time during the year, own certain foreign property costing more than $100,000 are required to file Form T1135 Foreign Income Verification Statement. As of February 9, 2015, individual taxpayers are able to file this form electronically for the 2014 tax year. In the future, electronic filing will be extended to corporations and partnerships.

My Business Account

  • My Business Account has been expanded to allow taxpayers to file returns, Notices of Objection and refunds in regards to excise duties, excise taxes, air travelers security charges and softwood lumber products export charges.
  • This account also permits additional GST/HST elections i.e. GST20-1 Notice of Revocation of an Election for GST/HST Reporting Period by a Listed Financial Institution and RC7220 Election for GST/HST and QST Reporting Period for a Selected Listed Financial Institution
  • Updated options such as payment searches for payments made but not credited to the account and requests to transfer misallocated credits have been added to the Payroll Accounts.
  • Taxpayers can now authorize the CRA to withdraw pre-authorized debits from bank accounts. Taxpayers and designated representatives may manage direct deposits directly through My Business Account.

Represent a Client

  • The CRA noted that business authorization requests can be submitted online and will be reviewed and processed within five business days.
  • A non-resident representative living in the U.S. who wants to access the Represent a Client portal can obtain a non-resident representative number (NRRN) by completing the RC391 Application for a CRA NRRN.
  • Additional changes are expected in April 2015 to permit representatives to register new businesses and add program accounts on behalf of taxpayers.
  • The Tax Data Delivery Service allows authorized representatives to electronically receive information to help client income tax and benefit returns. It delivers tax information including T4 slips (i.e., T4A, T4E, T4A(OAS), T4A(P)), Home Buyers’ Plan, tuition carryover amounts.
  • To use this service, representatives must be a registered electronic filer, registered in Represent a Client, use an EFILE certified product and have a valid Form T1030 Authorizing or Cancelling a Representative.

Mobile Apps

  • In addition to the updated services provided in the online portals, the CRA also introduced new mobile apps.
  • In August 2014, the CRA Business Tax Reminder was released for small and medium sized enterprises with annual revenues of $20 million or less and less than 500 employees. This app allows taxpayers to create reminders and alerts for key dates related to instalment payments, returns, and remittances. See our post here.
  • More recently, on February 9, 2015, the CRA released MyCRA. This new app allows individual taxpayers to view Notices of Assessment, tax return status, and RRSP and TFSA contribution room. In the future it will permit taxpayers to update contact information and enroll for direct deposit.

Non-Resident Taxation in Canada – Regulation 102/105

Claudio DiRienzo, Policy and Technical Advisor at the Specialty Audit Division Compliance Programs Branch, provided an update on issues pertaining to Regulations 102 and 105. In general, these regulations require payors of non-residents rendering services in Canada to withhold and remit tax on the payments subject to treaty-based waivers.

Reduce Red Tape

  • The CRA acknowledged current frustrations among taxpayers and representatives with the cumbersome Regulation 105 and 102 processes and noted that the CRA continues to consult with stakeholders and tax professionals to reduce red tape. However, the CRA emphasized that certain processes were required to comply with existing legislation. The CRA suggested that amendments be made to the current legislation to help streamline the waiver process.
  • Centres of Expertise have been established for the waivers to ensure consistency among waiver requests. To shorten processing times, the CRA advised that comprehensive information be provided and a Business Number (BN) or Individual Tax Number (ITN) be applied for in advance.
  • CRA Document No. IC 75-6R2 states that approximately 30 days are required to review waiver applications. However, the CRA noted in reality the wait time varies on inventory and workload.

R102J and R102R Waivers

  • The CRA commented on the difference between R102J and R102R waivers. Both are treaty-based waivers used by non-residents to reduce the amount of withholding. The R102J is a joint employer and employee waiver and applies only to amounts less than $5,000 if the other country has a tax treaty with Canada or amounts less than $10,000 if the other country is the US. The waiver is effective for a year. To accommodate employers, the waiver is retroactive for 60 days prior to the date granted and an ITN or SIN can be provided at the end of the year.
  • In contrast, the R102R does not have the 60-day retroactive concession and requires a SIN or ITN at the time the waiver is granted.

Short Waivers Granted

  • The CRA acknowledged concerns that Regulation 102R waivers were being issued for short time periods (i.e., six months). As a result, taxpayers were required to reapply for waivers for the remainder of the taxation year. The CRA explained that this arose out of concerns that the employee would constitute a permanent establishment of the employer under Article XV, the Dependent Personal Services provision of the Canada-U.S. Tax Treaty.
  • The CRA representatives responsible for processing waivers do not make determinations in regards to a permanent establishment at the time of the waiver. This determination is made at the time of filing.
  • The CRA noted that it has now revised its position. If the applicant provides the approximate number of days he or she will be in Canada and approximate remuneration amounts, the waiver applies for a full calendar year.


  • The CRA also commented on the use of secondment arrangements to manage Regulation 102 and 105 issues. A secondment is the temporary assignment of loan of an employee between two entities. The CRA noted that whether withholding is required under a secondment arrangement is a question of fact. In order to waive withholding a genuine employer-employee relationship must exist.
  • No Regulation 105 withholding is required for reasonable reimbursements under a secondment. CRA Document No. IC 75-6R2, which provides guidelines on secondment arrangements, states that administrative overhead of $250 per month per employee constitutes a reasonable reimbursement.

Updates in Case Law and Administrative Policy

  • The CRA noted that it accepts the Weyerhaeuser Company Limited v. The Queen (2007 TCC 65) decision, which generally held that not all payments to non-residents are subject to withholding tax. However, the CRA noted that they would only apply Regulation 105 consistently with this decision if the taxpayer’s information is documented at the time the payment is made.
  • The CRA is currently in the process of developing a set of guidelines and policy directions for Regulation 102 and Regulation 105 and updating CRA Document No. IC 75-6R2. An online portal for waivers is expected to be launched in 2016.

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Highlights from the Toronto Centre CRA & Professionals Group Breakfast Seminar – February 19, 2015

FCA Cautions Parties on Adjournment Requests

In recent years the Tax Court of Canada has strictly applied the requirements for adjournments and timetable amendments as described in the Court’s Practice Note No. 14. We understand this may have been prompted by a practice that had developed over time whereby the parties to an appeal would consent to extensions of time or adjournments and then informally seek the Court’s approval.

The Federal Court of Appeal appears to have been wrestling with similar scheduling and adjournment issues. In UHA Research Society v. Canada (2014 FCA 134), the Appellant sought an adjournment of a hearing date due to the unavailability of counsel.

In a lengthy discussion of the Court’s scheduling process, the Court’s expectations of counsel and the test for an adjournment request (i.e., there must be significant new developments, marked changes in circumstances, or compelling reasons of fairness), Justice Stratas provided a reminder about the Court’s procedure and practice regarding adjournments.

In UHA, Justice Stratas granted the adjournment request, but cautioned:

[18] Having written these reasons – reasons written in response to a spate of recent incidents of lack of regard for scheduling orders of this Court – I may well be less accommodating in a future case.


FCA Cautions Parties on Adjournment Requests

There’s A Litigation App For That?

We were intrigued to learn that KosInteractive LLC has created the U.S. “Fed Courts” app for Android and Apple devices which contains helpful information about U.S. federal courts rules of procedure and court information. The app provides access to the PACER (Public Access to Court Electronic Records) database, and the procedural rules for appellate, bankruptcy, civil, and criminal proceedings. The federal rules of evidence and the U.S. Supreme Court procedural rules are also available. One drawback – the information isn’t searchable or indexed with hyperlinks.

In any event, there seems to be no Canadian equivalent for litigation or procedural apps.

A quick search in the Apple iTunes stores for “Canada tax” returns 54 results, including an array of federal and provincial tax calculators. “Canada courts” returns five items, including apps related to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, mortgage foreclosures, U.S. Miranda warnings, and a car dealership. A search for “Ontario civil procedure” returns one item, and “Canada tax court” returns zero items.

We are reminded of the very helpful event app developed by the Canadian Tax Foundation that has become a regular feature of the Foundation’s national and regional conferences.

We are confident that Canadian tax professionals would welcome a broader array of court and litigation procedure apps that would provide mobile access to most or all of the court and procedural information we’re stuffing into our oversized litigation bags.

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There’s A Litigation App For That?

Highlights from the Toronto Centre CRA & Professionals Group Breakfast Seminar (Objections and Appeals) – November 6, 2013

On November 6, 2013, at the Toronto Centre Canada Revenue Agency & Professionals Breakfast Seminar, representatives from the CRA provided an update on objections and appeals.

Anne-Marie Levesque, Assistant Commissioner of Appeals, presented these slides and made the following comments:

  • The Appeals Branch reviews objections to assessments from the following branches:
    • Compliance programs (audit)
    • Assessment and benefit services
    • Taxpayer services and debt management (collections)
  • The Appeals Branch will not normally contact an assessing branch unless the assessing position is unclear or pertinent information is missing. If this is the case, the practice of the Appeals Branch is to note this in the file.
  • The Appeals Branch is aware and concerned about the time required to process large files, which may take a few months to assign, and up to a year to resolve.
  • The Appeals Branch manual is available at CRA Reading Rooms. A taxpayer may visit these rooms and ask for a copy, and an appeals officer will provide a copy.
  • The Appeals Branch has been “swamped” by objections in the last 5-8 years, most relating to tax shelters. Historically, the Appeals Branch received 50,000 objections per year, but in recent years has received up to 100,000 objections per year. Currently there is a “significant backlog” of objections in the Appeals Branch’s inventory.
  • The Appeals Branch is distributing certain files to particular offices across the country (i.e., alimony, Disability Tax Credits, Child Care Tax Benefits, GST credits, etc.) to streamline the resolution for less complex objections.
  • Large group files (i.e., tax shelter objections) have been concentrated in the Toronto North Tax Services Office.
  • The Appeals Branch has designated certain offices as industry specialists: forestry in Vancouver; resources in Calgary; insurance, banking and mining in Toronto North; and manufacturing in Montreal.
  • The Appeals Branch has moved away from the practice of granting face-to-face meetings (too expensive and time consuming, requires that objections be assigned to offices located near taxpayer’s home or office). While some files may still require in-person meetings, for most files the appeals officer will not meet with the taxpayer or the taxpayer’s representative. However, the Appeals Branch is committed to communicating with taxpayers and their representatives over the phone and in writing.
  • The Appeals Branch will continue to ask that taxpayers make written submissions. This is to protect the integrity of the decision-making process – both for the Appeals Branch’s internal quality standards and for the purposes of any external review by the Auditor General.
  • Generally, the Appeals Branch is committed to resolving disputes prior to litigation. Taking a file to the Tax Court is the exception and not the rule for the Appeals Branch.
  • The “benefit of the doubt” should go to the taxpayer where there is credible evidence in support of the taxpayer’s version of the facts. If the taxpayer’s version of the facts makes sense and is reasonable, the Appeals Branch may give the taxpayer the benefit of the doubt even in the absence of documentary evidence. However, in such cases, the Appeals Branch expects that the taxpayer will be diligent about maintaining proper documentation to avoid the same problem in the future.
  • The Appeals Branch has had a settlement protocol with the Department of Justice since 2004, which has evolved over time. Recent amendments give Department of Justice counsel additional leeway to resolve low-complexity files without having to obtain instructions from the CRA litigation officer – this would apply to all informal procedure appeals and some general procedure appeals. Conversely, the settlement protocol empowers CRA litigation officers to settle informal procedure appeals without requiring sign-off by the Department of Justice.
  • Historically, the Crown is successful in approximately 85% of appeals to the Tax Court. This rate fluctuates over time, but in the last three months the Crown’s success rate has increased. The increase may be due to the efforts of the CRA and the Department of Justice to settle those appeals that should not go forward to a full hearing.
  • When the Crown loses an appeal in the Tax Court, the reasons for judgment are reviewed by the Adverse Decision Committee, which includes the Assistant Commissioner of the Appeals Branch, Assistant Commissioners from the assessing branches, senior counsel from the Department of Justice, and a senior representative from the Department of Finance. The Committee considers whether there has been an error of law and the chance of success on appeal.
  • The Appeals Branch has initiated a pilot project in British Columbia under which appeals officers will be empowered to consider relief from interest and penalties at the same time they are considering the substantive tax issues on objection. The Appeals Branch is still considering how this process may work, due to the different processes by which these decisions may be appealed by the taxpayer (i.e., appeal to the Tax Court for tax assessments, and judicial review of decisions regarding interest and penalty relief).
  • Auditors are empowered to “waive” interest and penalties before assessing, while appeals officers may “cancel” interest and penalties after assessment.
  • Remission orders under the Financial Administration Act are not dealt with by the Appeals Branch and are granted to taxpayers only in rare circumstances.
  • The Appeals Branch would prefer that taxpayers not appeal to the Tax Court immediately after 90 days have passed from the date of filing the Notice of Objection.

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Highlights from the Toronto Centre CRA & Professionals Group Breakfast Seminar (Objections and Appeals) – November 6, 2013