1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

McIntyre: Not What You Bargained For?

When are the parties to a civil tax dispute bound by agreed facts from a criminal proceeding?

This was the question considered by the Tax Court of Canada on a Rule 58 motion made by the taxpayers in McIntrye et al v. The Queen (2014 TCC 111). Specifically, the taxpayers argued the principles of issue estoppel, res judicata, and abuse of process applied to prevent the Minister of National Revenue (the “Minister”) from assuming facts inconsistent with agreed facts from a prior criminal guilty plea.

In McIntyre, two individuals and their corporation were audited for the 2002 to 2007 tax years. The individuals and the corporation were charged with criminal income tax evasion. As part of a plea bargain, one individual and the corporation plead guilty based on certain agreed facts, and the court imposed sentences accordingly. The other individual was not convicted.

Subsequently, the Minister issued GST reassessments of the corporation, and further reassessments of the individuals for income tax. In issuing the reassessments, the Minister refused to be bound by the agreed facts from the criminal proceeding. In the Notices of Appeal in the Tax Court, the taxpayers argued the reassessments must be consistent with the agreed facts.

The taxpayers brought a motion under section 58 of the Tax Court Rules (General Procedure) for a determination of a question of law or mixed fact and law before the hearing of the appeals. Specifically, the taxpayers asked (i) whether the doctrines of issue estoppel, res judicata and abuse of process prevented the Minister from making assumptions inconsistent with the agreed facts, and (ii) whether the parties were bound by the agreed facts in respect of the calculation of certain capital gains, shareholder debts, losses and shareholder benefits.

The taxpayers argued that it was appropriate to deal with these issues before the hearing, whereas the Crown argued that these issues could not be determined on a Rule 58 motion because, in this case, the facts arose from a plea bargain rather than a determination by a court, the agreed facts did not address the GST liability of the corporation or the other individual’s income tax liability, and the facts (and tax liability) of a criminal proceeding would only prohibit the parties from alleging a lower tax liability in a civil proceeding.

The Tax Court dismissed the taxpayer’s motion. The Court considered the applicable test on a Rule 58 motion, namely that there must be a question of law or mixed fact and law, the question must be raised by a pleading, and the determination of the question must dispose of all or part of the proceeding (see HSBC Bank Canada v. The Queen, 2011 TCC 37).

The Court stated that, in this case, only the first two requirements were met:

[35] I agree with the Respondent’s analysis of the caselaw. It confirms that prior convictions in criminal proceedings resulting from plea bargains, although a factor that may go to weight in a civil tax proceeding, are not determinative of the relevant facts and issues in a subsequent tax appeal.

[38] In MacIver v The Queen, 2005 TCC 250, 2005 DTC 654, Justice Hershfield also concluded that a question is best left to the trial Judge where the motion is merely to estop a party from contesting certain facts that will not dismiss an entire appeal. As noted in his reasons, unless such a question can fully dispose of an appeal by finding that issue estoppel applies, a Rule 58 determination could do little more than split an appeal and tie the hands of the trial Judge.

The Court noted that the agreed facts did not address the corporate GST liability or the second individual’s income tax liability, dealt only with the 2004 to 2007 tax years, and did not address the imposition of gross negligence penalties. The Court concluded that issue estoppel would not apply because there was not a sufficient identity of issues between the criminal and civil proceedings. It would be unfair, the Tax Court stated, to prohibit the parties from adducing evidence in the civil tax appeals where there had been no introduction and weighing of evidence in the criminal proceeding.

McIntyre: Not What You Bargained For?

Taxpayer entitled to disclosure of the “policy” underlying statutory provisions allegedly abused in GAAR cases

On December 20, 2012, the Tax Court ruled on a motion under Rule 52 of the Tax Court of Canada Rules (General Procedure) (the “Rules”) to require the Minister to comply with a demand for particulars specifying how the Income Tax Act (the “Act”) was abused in a General Anti-Avoidance rule (“GAAR”) case.

In Birchcliff Energy Ltd. v The Queen (2012-10887(IT)G), the Minister alleged that the GAAR should apply because the series of transactions (the “Transactions”) undertaken by the taxpayer resulted in a misuse of 10 sections of the Act and an abuse of the Act as a whole. In response, the taxpayer sought an order requiring the Minister to disclose the policy behind each section of the Act that was allegedly abused and how the Transactions abused that policy.

The Tax Court held that the Minister must disclose the object, spirit, and purpose of the provisions of the Act (the “Policy”) that the assessor relied upon in making the assessment. The Minister does not need to disclose the actual Policy that will be argued at trial, or the way that the Policy was abused.

Arguments

The taxpayer argued that in making a GAAR assessment, the Minister must assume as a fact the Policy and an abuse of that Policy. Relying on Johnston v M.N.R. (1948 S.C.R. 486), the taxpayer argued that the Crown had a duty to disclose “precise findings of fact and rulings of law which have given rise to the controversy”. The taxpayer also argued that there was a heightened obligation on the Minister to be specific in cases of misconduct, negligence, or misrepresentation, relying on Chief Justice Bowman’s decision in Ver v Canada ([1995] T.C.J. No. 593). Misuse or abuse, it was argued, belonged in the category of offenses requiring more precise disclosure.

The Minister, on the other hand, argued that the Policy was a conclusion of law, not fact and that only allegations of fact must be disclosed in particulars. The Minister raised a “slippery slope” argument, suggesting that this ruling could require the Crown to explain its legal interpretation of all provisions of the Act in the future. Although the Minister acknowledged that Trustco v Canada (2005 SCC 54) placed the burden of identifying the Policy on the Crown, that burden did not apply to pleadings. The Minister also argued that disclosing the Policy would not help the Appellant because the Minister could still argue a different policy at trial.

Decision

The Tax Court highlighted the unique nature of GAAR, and stated that any disclosure requirements from this case would only apply to GAAR assessments. Justice Campbell Miller specifically pointed to the Crown’s burden to prove the Policy in GAAR cases as evidence of its unique requirements.

Justice Miller separated the elements of the Policy into two distinct categories:

1)      The actual Policy that would be argued and decided at trial (the “True Policy”), and

2)      The fact that the Crown relied on a particular Policy when determining that GAAR should be applied (the “Historical Policy”).

The Court held that the True Policy was a question of law that should ultimately be decided by the court. This policy was open to change throughout the course of litigation and did not need to be disclosed to the Appellant at this stage.

The Historical Policy, however, was held to be “a material fact, not an assumption, but the fact the Minister relied upon x or y policy underlying the legislative provisions at play in the case.” Taxpayers are entitled in pleadings to know the basis of the assessment. Disclosing the Historical Policy would be similar to disclosing the legislation upon which non-GAAR assessments are made. The Court distinguished the Historical Policy from the type of materials to which the taxpayer was denied access in Mastronardi v The Queen (2010 TCC 57), a recent Tax Court decision holding that the Minister did not need to disclose the extrinsic materials on which the Minister relied in determining the Policy. In Mastronardi, the materials sought to be disclosed were evidence that could be used to prove the policy, rather than the material fact of which policy was relied on (evidence itself is not a material fact).

The Historical Policy that must be disclosed is not the Policy of each identified section in isolation. The Minister must identify the collective policy of all of the identified provisions together that the Crown relied on in making the assessment. The Historical Policy should be disclosed under paragraph 49(1)(e) of the Rules as “any other material fact”.

With regards to the Appellant’s request for information on how the Policy was abused, the Court held that it was not required to be disclosed. Abuse is a conclusion of law to be determined by the court based on the Policy and the facts of the case. The Minister did not assume how the Policy was abused as a fact. The Minister concluded, based on the Policy and the facts assumed, that there was an abuse.

*  *  *

The Tax Court has reiterated that the taxpayer is entitled to know the basis of the assessment made against him.  Such an approach is consistent with principles of fundamental fairness and is entirely in keeping with the letter and spirit of the Rules.

, , ,

Taxpayer entitled to disclosure of the “policy” underlying statutory provisions allegedly abused in GAAR cases

Tax Court of Canada confirms that pleadings will be struck out only in the “clearest of cases”

On December 19, 2011, the Tax Court dismissed a motion by General Electric Canada Company and GE Capital Canada Funding Company (the “Appellants”) in their current appeals (2010-3493(IT)G and 2010-3494(IT)G). The Appellants sought to strike several paragraphs from the Replies filed by the Crown on the basis that the Crown was relitigating a previously-decided matter. Justice Diane Campbell dismissed the motion but gave leave to the Crown to make a small amendment to one of the Replies.

General Electric Canada Company (“GECC”) is the successor by amalgamation to General Electric Capital Canada Inc. (“GECCI”), and GECC had inherited commercial debts owed by GECCI. GECC was reassessed and denied the deduction of fees paid to its parent corporation (“GECUS”) for guaranteeing the inherited debts. However, GECCI had previously litigated the deductibility of those fees and won (see General Electric Capital Canada Inc. v. The Queen, 2009 TCC 563, aff’d 2010 FCA 344). The current appeal involves similar issues, but with different taxpayers (GECC instead of GECCI) and tax years. In their application, the Appellants argued that the Crown was trying to relitigate issues that had been decided in the previous appeal.

The Court first dealt with the Appellant’s contention that res judicata precluded the Crown from having the issues reheard in another trial. Res judicata may take one of two forms: “cause of action” estoppel or “issue” estoppel. For either to apply, the parties in the current matter must have been privy to the previous concluded litigation. The Appellants said GECC had been privy to the decision since both it and GECCI were controlled by a common mind. The Court dismissed that argument since the appeals involve different tax years from those in the previous concluded litigation and, therefore, reflect different causes of action.

The Appellants also argued that it was an abuse of the Court’s process to relitigate the purpose and deductibility of the fees since the debt and the fee agreements were substantially the same as those in the previous concluded litigation. They asked the Court to strike out references to those agreements from the Replies. The Crown’s counter-argument was that the nature of the agreements was a live issue since it was not established that the fee agreements between GECUS and GECC were the same as those with GECCI. The Court agreed and refused to strike the sections of the Replies referring to the agreements.

The Appellants also sought to strike parts of the Replies where the Crown denied facts which the Appellants said had been proven in the previous concluded litigation. Again, the Court noted that the issues in the present appeals were different than those at issue in the previous concluded litigation, and that the Appellants did not show that the facts at issue (which were part of a joint statement of facts in the prior case) had actually been considered by the Court in the prior decision. Since the facts had not been proven they were best left to be determined later at trial.

Further, the Appellants contested two theories reflected in the Replies that they characterized as a fishing expedition. The Appellants stated these theories were not used as a basis for the original reassessment and, therefore, violated the restrictions on alternative arguments under subsection 152(9) of the Act. The Court dismissed this argument, saying that the theories were simply alternative approaches to showing that the guarantee fees paid by GECC were not deductible. The Court held they were alternative pleadings and refused to strike them out. Further, the Appellants also argued that two separate basis for the reassessments (one based on paragraphs 247(2)(a) and (c); the other, on paragraphs 247(2)(b) and (d)) should be pleaded as alternative grounds, since the two parts of that section were inconsistent with one another. This was dismissed on the basis that the two parts were complementary and were drafted in a way so that if both were satisfied, one would take precedence over the other.

Finally, the Appellants argued that they had been deprived of procedural fairness as the CRA had not consulted its own Transfer Pricing and Review Committee with respect to the reassessments, and the Appellants had been unable to make submissions to that committee. The Court held that there was no requirement that the committee consider the matter first and, even if there was, the Tax Court does not rule on administrative matters.

In the end, the Appellants succeeded on one minor point: the Crown will amend one paragraph in one Reply to clarify the distinction between legally binding guarantees and implied guarantees or support. The Crown was awarded costs.

, , ,

Tax Court of Canada confirms that pleadings will be struck out only in the “clearest of cases”