1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

McIntyre: Not What You Bargained For?

When are the parties to a civil tax dispute bound by agreed facts from a criminal proceeding?

This was the question considered by the Tax Court of Canada on a Rule 58 motion made by the taxpayers in McIntrye et al v. The Queen (2014 TCC 111). Specifically, the taxpayers argued the principles of issue estoppel, res judicata, and abuse of process applied to prevent the Minister of National Revenue (the “Minister”) from assuming facts inconsistent with agreed facts from a prior criminal guilty plea.

In McIntyre, two individuals and their corporation were audited for the 2002 to 2007 tax years. The individuals and the corporation were charged with criminal income tax evasion. As part of a plea bargain, one individual and the corporation plead guilty based on certain agreed facts, and the court imposed sentences accordingly. The other individual was not convicted.

Subsequently, the Minister issued GST reassessments of the corporation, and further reassessments of the individuals for income tax. In issuing the reassessments, the Minister refused to be bound by the agreed facts from the criminal proceeding. In the Notices of Appeal in the Tax Court, the taxpayers argued the reassessments must be consistent with the agreed facts.

The taxpayers brought a motion under section 58 of the Tax Court Rules (General Procedure) for a determination of a question of law or mixed fact and law before the hearing of the appeals. Specifically, the taxpayers asked (i) whether the doctrines of issue estoppel, res judicata and abuse of process prevented the Minister from making assumptions inconsistent with the agreed facts, and (ii) whether the parties were bound by the agreed facts in respect of the calculation of certain capital gains, shareholder debts, losses and shareholder benefits.

The taxpayers argued that it was appropriate to deal with these issues before the hearing, whereas the Crown argued that these issues could not be determined on a Rule 58 motion because, in this case, the facts arose from a plea bargain rather than a determination by a court, the agreed facts did not address the GST liability of the corporation or the other individual’s income tax liability, and the facts (and tax liability) of a criminal proceeding would only prohibit the parties from alleging a lower tax liability in a civil proceeding.

The Tax Court dismissed the taxpayer’s motion. The Court considered the applicable test on a Rule 58 motion, namely that there must be a question of law or mixed fact and law, the question must be raised by a pleading, and the determination of the question must dispose of all or part of the proceeding (see HSBC Bank Canada v. The Queen, 2011 TCC 37).

The Court stated that, in this case, only the first two requirements were met:

[35] I agree with the Respondent’s analysis of the caselaw. It confirms that prior convictions in criminal proceedings resulting from plea bargains, although a factor that may go to weight in a civil tax proceeding, are not determinative of the relevant facts and issues in a subsequent tax appeal.

[38] In MacIver v The Queen, 2005 TCC 250, 2005 DTC 654, Justice Hershfield also concluded that a question is best left to the trial Judge where the motion is merely to estop a party from contesting certain facts that will not dismiss an entire appeal. As noted in his reasons, unless such a question can fully dispose of an appeal by finding that issue estoppel applies, a Rule 58 determination could do little more than split an appeal and tie the hands of the trial Judge.

The Court noted that the agreed facts did not address the corporate GST liability or the second individual’s income tax liability, dealt only with the 2004 to 2007 tax years, and did not address the imposition of gross negligence penalties. The Court concluded that issue estoppel would not apply because there was not a sufficient identity of issues between the criminal and civil proceedings. It would be unfair, the Tax Court stated, to prohibit the parties from adducing evidence in the civil tax appeals where there had been no introduction and weighing of evidence in the criminal proceeding.

McIntyre: Not What You Bargained For?

CRA Provides Update on NPO Project

In 2009, the CRA commenced a broad review of the non-profit organization sector. You or your clients may have received a CRA questionnaire asking that the NPO provide information or documents in respect of its structure, activities, bylaws, finances, and membership.

Generally, NPOs have been exempt from tax in Canada since the introduction of the income tax in 1917. Under paragraph 149(1)(l) of the Income Tax Act, no Part I tax is payable by a club, society or association that is not a charity, is organized and operated for any purpose other than profit, and no part of the income of which is payable to any proprietor, member or shareholder. Currently, there may be up to 80,000 NPOs in Canada that qualify for the tax exemption under paragraph 149(1)(l). Prior to 2009, the CRA had not undertaken a general review of this sector.

Recently, the CRA published a report and Q&A on the Non-Profit Organization Risk Identification Project (NPORIP). In its report, the CRA stated the review revealed that many NPOs would fail to meet at least one of the requirements set out in paragraph 149(1)(l) of the Act:

The NPORIP was designed to provide the CRA with insight into the way certain organizations—those seeking an exemption from tax under paragraph 149(1)(l) of the Act—operate under the income tax rules. The NPORIP has given the CRA a better understanding of the issues these organizations face in complying with the Act, and, in particular, has highlighted a number of areas where the non-profit sector’s understanding of the law differs from that of the CRA. In addition, the NPORIP has revealed a significant issue with compliance by these organizations in several key areas.

The report provides only a high-level summary of its findings, none of which are surprising:

  • The NPORIP identified a small number of cases where the NPO was, in fact, a charity;
  • The NPORIP identified a small number of cases where the NPO’s governing documents (such as articles of incorporation, letters patent, and by-laws) indicated that it was not organized exclusively for a purpose other than profit;
  • The NPORIP noted a variety of activities with apparent profit motives carried out by a wide range of NPOs; and
  • The NPORIP identified a small number of cases where the NPO had income payable or made available for the personal benefit of a proprietor, member, or shareholder.

The report states that the CRA will seek to improve its education and outreach in the NPO sector, so as to increase awareness and compliance. Additionally, the CRA indicated that a copy of the report had been provided to the Department of Finance for the purpose of reviewing the NPO legislative framework.

We don’t think the report is the final word on this issue from either the CRA or the Department of Finance. In fact, in its 2014 federal budget, the Department of Finance stated:

… Budget 2014 announces the Government’s intention to review whether the income tax exemption for NPOs remains properly targeted and whether sufficient transparency and accountability provisions are in place. This review will not extend to registered charities or registered Canadian amateur athletic associations. As part of the review, the Government will release a consultation paper for comment and will further consult with stakeholders as appropriate.

We expect that future legislative changes (i.e., increased reporting requirements) may be forthcoming in the next few years.

, ,

CRA Provides Update on NPO Project

International and Transfer Pricing Audits: Toronto Centre Canada Revenue Agency & Professionals Breakfast Seminar

International and Transfer Pricing Audits

At the Toronto Centre Canada Revenue Agency & Professionals Breakfast Seminar on February 18, 2014, the CRA provided an update on international and transfer pricing audits. The slides can be found here. The discussion was led by Paul Stesco, Manager of the International Advisory Services Section, International and Large Business Directorate, Compliance Programs Branch of the CRA and Cliff Rand, National Managing Partner of Deloitte Tax Law LLP.  Here is a brief overview of some of the highlights from the presentation on how such audits are performed:

  • Research and Analysis Stage: the CRA uses the internet extensively for research (e.g. industry analysis, competitor analysis, etc.) as well as prior audit reports, tax returns and annual reports of taxapyers to identify transactions and the appropriate transfer pricing methods applicable to those transactions.
  • Mandatory Referrals to Headquarters: mandatory referrals by the field auditor to the International Tax Division (“ITD”) are required in several situations including: cost contribution arrangements, reassessments that could be issued after the tax treaty deadlines, transfer pricing penalties under subsection 247(3), recharacterization under paragraphs 247(2)(b) and (d), the application of subsection 95(6) and downward pricing adjustments under subsection 247(2) and (10). Situations which involve the use of “secret comparables” to reassess the taxpayer (i.e. comparables used by the CRA that cannot be found in a public database) will automatically be forwarded to the ITD; the CRA will not forward audit issues to the ITD if the “secret comparables” were used only for risk analysis.
  • Access to Taxpayers: during an audit, the CRA may request access to certain individuals involved in the taxpayer’s business. The CRA does not necessarily require physical access to non-resident taxpayers; a telephone interview may suffice. An interview with operational personnel is likely to streamline the audit and, as such, is in the best interests of the taxpayer. Taxpayers are permitted to record such interviews (even including the use of a court reporter to produce a transcript).
  • Currency of Auditsinstead of proceeding on a year by year basis, audits will now generally begin with the most current risk-assessed taxation year (and one back year) and may then move back to other open years in respect of the same issue.  Having said that, there are still “legacy files” within the CRA’s system.
  • Concerns/Complaints: a taxpayer who wishes to express concerns about a transfer pricing audit should follow the appropriate local chain of command: first contact the auditor, then the Team Leader and the relevant Section Manager at the local TSO. Taxpayers should refrain from directly contacting Head Office. The CRA stressed the importance of communicating with the audit team on a regular basis.
  • Contemporaneous Documentation Requirement in subsection 247(4): the CRA acknowledged that transfer pricing studies have been accepted even if they were prepared after the period to which they relate.
  • Transfer Pricing Review Committee (TPRC): two types of referrals proceed to the TPRC: (1) penalty referrals under subsection 247(3) which involve transfer pricing adjustments in excess of 10% of gross revenue or greater than $5,000,000; and (2) referrals of recharacterization as an assessing position under paragraph 247(2)(b).
    • As of October 31, 2013, penalty referrals made up 86.5% of all referrals while recharacterization referrals accounted for 13.5% of all referrals.
    • The taxpayer does not have direct access to the TPRC to make submissions. However, minutes of committee meetings may be obtained by making an Access to Information request.

, , ,

International and Transfer Pricing Audits: Toronto Centre Canada Revenue Agency & Professionals Breakfast Seminar

CRA’s New Pre-Rulings Consultations Service

On November 26th, 2013, the Canada Revenue Agency (“CRA”) participated in a Roundtable session at the 65th Annual Tax Conference of the Canadian Tax Foundation held in Toronto, Ontario. The panelists announced a one-year pilot project for Pre-Ruling Consultations.

Taxpayers may now approach the Income Tax Rulings Directorate (“ITRD”) on a formal, written basis to obtain a preliminary ‘pre-ruling’ on a particular issue in order to determine whether the ITRD will issue a full ruling on the same issue in the future.  A fee will be charged for taxpayers who use this service.

As noted on the CRA website “the purpose of the pre-ruling consultation is to reduce the likelihood of the taxpayer incurring significant costs as a result of submitting a request for a ruling that ITRD will be unable to provide.”

CRA’s New Pre-Rulings Consultations Service

Canada’s Taxpayer Ombudsman Addresses Fear of Reprisal

In the August 2013 edition of Perspectives, Taxpayer Ombudsman J. Paul Dubé highlighted the recent addition of Article 16 to the Taxpayers’ Bill of Rights protecting taxpayers against any possibility of reprisals by the CRA.

Previously, in June 2013, Gail Shea, then-Minister of National Revenue, and Mr. Dubé announced the addition of Article 16 to the Taxpayers’ Bill of Rights:

16. You have the right to lodge a service complaint and request a formal review without fear of reprisal.

In the newsletter, Mr. Dube states,

This right means that if you lodge a service complaint and request a formal review of a CRA decision, you can be confident that the CRA will treat you impartially, and that you will receive the benefits, credits, and refunds to which you are entitled, and pay no more and no less than what is required by law. You should not fear reprisal.

, ,

Canada’s Taxpayer Ombudsman Addresses Fear of Reprisal

Waiving rights of objection and appeal: SCC declines to hear the taxpayer’s appeal in Taylor v. The Queen

On August 15, 2013, the Supreme Court of Canada dismissed the application for leave to appeal in Terry E.Taylor v. Her Majesty the Queen (2012 FCA 148).

In Taylor, the issue was whether a signed settlement agreement under which the taxpayer waived his right to appeal was binding. In that case, the taxpayer was assessed for income tax and GST, as well as gross negligence penalties and interest. He signed a settlement agreement under which the Minister of National Revenue would vacate the gross negligence penalties and, in exchange, he would waive his right to object or appeal in accordance with subsections 165(1.2) and 169(2.2) of the Income Tax Act and subsections 301(1.6) and 206.1(2) of the Excise Tax Act. The taxpayer, who did not have counsel advising him at the time, later claimed that he was under duress when he signed the agreement. Having already disposed of the penalties, he went to Tax Court to challenge the amount of tax assessed.

Justice Judith Woods held that the taxpayer’s testimony that he was “scared” and pressured into signing the agreement lacked credibility given his qualifications as a Certified Management Accountant and his extensive business and financial experience. He had ample time to consult with counsel prior to meeting with the CRA. The Tax Court held that the settlement agreement was “freely made” and signed without “undue pressure.”  The Tax Court dismissed the taxpayer’s appeal (2010 TCC 246) and the Federal Court of Appeal affirmed at 2012 FCA 148. As noted above, the Supreme Court of Canada has declined to hear Mr. Taylor’s appeal.

Taylor adds to an existing body of case law on the question of whether, and under what circumstances, settlement agreements between taxpayers and the CRA can be set aside. The Tax Court has held that in certain limited circumstances a settlement agreement may not be binding. For example, in 1390758 Ontario Corporation v. The Queen (2010 TCC 572) and Huppe v. the Queen (2010 TCC 644), agreements were held to be binding so long as they were made on a “principled” basis (see, for example, Daniel Sandler and Colin Campbell, “Catch-22: A Principled Basis for the Settlement of Tax Appeals“, Canadian Tax Journal (2009), Vol. 57, No. 4, 762-86).

Given that a significant portion of tax disputes are settled and never reach the courtroom, professional advisors should ensure that taxpayers understand the implications of signing settlement agreements under which they relinquish rights of objection or appeal.

, ,

Waiving rights of objection and appeal: SCC declines to hear the taxpayer’s appeal in Taylor v. The Queen

The importance of a notice of objection: Salisbury v. The Queen

In Salisbury House of Canada Ltd. et al. v. The Queen (2013 TCC 236), the Tax Court of Canada reiterated the importance of the statutory preconditions that must be met before a taxpayer may appeal to the Court. These statutory requirements should be kept in mind by taxpayers who wish to ensure their disputes are heard on the substantive merits rather than dismissed for procedural reasons before they have an opportunity to argue their case.

In Salisbury, the corporate taxpayer operated several restaurants in the Winnipeg area. The company was assessed additional GST for the period February to June, 2006 but did not object to those assessments. Around the same time, a new board of directors was elected. Due to financial difficulties, the company made a proposal under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and attempted to negotiate an agreement with the CRA pertaining to the GST arrears. The parties eventually agreed that a portion of the GST liability would be paid. Importantly, at this point, no directors’ liability assessments had been issued under s. 323 of the Excise Tax Act. Payment was remitted, but the directors sought to have their potential liability for tax determined “by a court of competent jurisdiction”.

The company and the individual directors each filed a Notice of Appeal in the Tax Court. In response, the Crown brought a motion to dismiss the appeals pursuant to paragraph 53(b) of the Tax Court of Canada Rules (General Procedure) on the grounds that (inter alia) the appeals were scandalous, frivolous or vexatious.

Under section 306 of the Excise Tax Act, a taxpayer must file a notice of objection before a Notice of Appeal may be filed in the Tax Court. In Salisbury, the GST assessments against the corporate taxpayer had not been challenged by way of objection and there had been no assessments issued against the directors.  The Minister argued that the appellants had no statutory right of appeal because the requirements of section 306 had not been met.

The Tax Court granted the Minister’s motion and dismissed the appeals. Since no notices of objection had been filed by the company, this precluded an appeal from the original GST assessments. In respect of the appeals by the individual directors, the Court held that they too could not succeed – no assessments had been issued, and no notices of objection filed.

The Salisbury decision is consistent with a long line of jurisprudence reflecting the requirement that taxpayers must satisfy the statutory preconditions before appealing to the Tax Court. In Roitman v. The Queen (2006 FCA 266), the Federal Court of Appeal stated that a court “does not acquire jurisdiction in matters of income tax assessments simply because a taxpayer has failed in due course to avail himself of the tools given to him by the Income Tax Act.” More recently, in Goguen v. The Queen (2007 DTC 5171), the Tax Court reiterated that, as “a matter of law, the failure of the [taxpayer] to serve a notice of objection on the Minister deprive[s] the Tax Court of Canada of the jurisdiction to entertain an appeal in relation to the assessment” (see also Whitford v. The Queen (2008 TCC 359), Bormann v. The Queen (2006 FCA 83), and Fidelity Global Opportunities Fund v. The Queen (2010 TCC 108)).

Salisbury reminds corporate and individual taxpayers of the need to obtain proper advice from tax professionals with respect to their rights and obligations under the Excise Tax Act and the Income Tax Act. This is all the more important in cases where the corporation is experiencing financial difficulty and/or contemplating protection under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (i.e., as the CRA may be a primary creditor). In Salisbury, the directors may not have been personally liable for corporate taxpayer’s GST liability. However, because of the manner and timing of the payment of GST arrears, their “appeal” to the Tax Court was defeated on procedural rather than substantive grounds and they were, unfortunately, precluded from presenting their case.

, , ,

The importance of a notice of objection: Salisbury v. The Queen

The Canada Revenue Agency’s Voluntary Disclosure Program: Current Processing Issues

The Canada Revenue Agency’s Voluntary Disclosure Program (VDP) has gone through a number of organizational changes over the past few years. For many years, disclosures were made to the local Tax Services Office. More recently, the CRA has moved the handling of disclosures to Regional Centres; Shawinigan – Sud Tax Centre for the Atlantic, Quebec, and Ontario Regions, Winnipeg Tax Centre for the Prairie Region and Surrey Tax Centre for the Pacific Region.

With the move of the VDP to Regional Centres, the CRA has implemented a new screening process. Screeners are now reviewing disclosure packages soon after receipt and are comparing the package to a CRA developed checklist. If any item on the checklist is missing or incomplete, then the CRA returns the package to the sender, along with a covering letter and a checklist that identifies the missing or incomplete information. There are, however, certain issues that have arisen with respect to the CRA’s screening process and use of the checklist.

First, it prevents a disclosure from being made by a taxpayer who does not have a social insurance number, business number, etc. If an identification number is not available, the disclosure may need to be made on a no-names basis while the taxpayer applies for an identification number.

Second, the CRA will not accept a disclosure if the amount in issue is not identified. This is problematic as, often, disclosures are made before the work needed to calculate the omitted or under-reported amount has been completed. In the past, this information was forwarded within 90 days of filing the disclosure and was an approach acceptable to the CRA.

Third, where the disclosure package is large, screeners do not appear to be reviewing all of the documents before issuing the letter and checklist. Therefore, it is advisable to use a covering letter for each disclosure package which identifies compliance with each item on the CRA’s checklist and a detailed explanation as to why any checklist item is outstanding. It is not yet clear whether, even upon explanation, the CRA will accept a disclosure if a checklist item is outstanding.

,

The Canada Revenue Agency’s Voluntary Disclosure Program: Current Processing Issues

Sales of condominium units under audit by Canada Revenue Agency

A Canada Revenue Agency (“CRA”) audit initiative is targeting taxpayers who have recently sold condominium units they did not occupy or occupied for only a short period of time (the “CRA Condo Project”).

The CRA is reassessing some of these dispositions on the basis that the condo was sold in the course of business, treating the profit as income (instead of capital gains) and, in some cases, assessing gross negligence penalties under subsection 163(2) of the Income Tax Act. In doing so, the CRA may be incorrectly reassessing some taxpayers whose gains are legitimate capital gains and that may be subject to the principal residence exemption (click here for a discussion of the principal residence exemption).

Consider this example. A taxpayer signs a pre-construction purchase agreement for a condo in 2007.  In 2009, the unit was completed and occupied by the taxpayer, before the entire development was finished and registered in land titles.  Land titles registration occurs in 2010, but shortly thereafter the taxpayer sells the condo for a profit.  Ordinarily, one would conclude the condo was held on account of capital and the gain would be at least partially exempt from tax on the basis that condo was the taxpayer’s principal residence.  The CRA may be inclined to reassess on the basis that land title records show the taxpayer on title for only a short time, as though the taxpayer had intended to merely “flip” the condo rather than reside in it.

This assessing position may be incorrect because the buyer of a condo does not appear on title until the entire condominium development is registered.  In fact, several years can pass from the date of signing the purchase agreement to occupancy to land titles registration – and, accordingly, the taxpayer’s actual length of ownership will not be apparent from the land title records.

This type of situation could cause serious problems for some taxpayers. If a taxpayer is audited and subject to reassessment on the basis that their entire gain should be taxed as income, the taxpayer will need to gather evidence and formulate arguments in time to respond to an audit proposal letter within 30 days, or file a Notice of Objection within 90 days of the date of a reassessment.

Taxpayers could respond to such a reassessment by providing evidence that they acquired the condo with the intent that it would be their residence, and that the subsequent sale was due to a change in life circumstances.  Taxpayers may wish to gather the following evidence to support such claims:

  • Purchase and sales agreements;
  • Letter or certificates granting permission to occupy the condo;
  • Proof of occupancy, such as utility bills, bank statements, CRA notices, identification (such as a driver’s license) showing the condo as a residence; or
  • Evidence of a change in life circumstances which caused the condo to no longer be a suitable residence, including:
    • Marriage or birth certificates;
    • A change of employer or enrollment in education that required relocation; or
    • Evidence showing the taxpayer cared for a sick or infirm relative, or had a disability that precluded using a condo as a residence.

Taxpayers should be prepared to provide reasonable explanations for any gaps in the evidence.  If a taxpayer wishes to explore how best to respond in the circumstances, they should consult with an experienced tax practitioner.

, , , , ,

Sales of condominium units under audit by Canada Revenue Agency

Rulings and GAAR to be Featured at the Toronto Centre CRA & Professionals Group Breakfast Meeting – June 6, 2013

The June 6th breakfast meeting of the Toronto Centre CRA & Professionals Group promises to be particularly informative. It features presentations from senior Ottawa CRA officials on the work of the Rulings Directorate and the CRA’s administration of the General Anti-Avoidance Rule. This is in addition to the case comments provided by Cliff Rand of Deloitte Tax Law LLP and Arnold Bornstein of the Department of Justice.

Please click here to register for the June 6th breakfast meeting.

, , , ,

Rulings and GAAR to be Featured at the Toronto Centre CRA & Professionals Group Breakfast Meeting – June 6, 2013